Fermilab History and Archives Project

The White House and Fermilab

White House Seal The White House and FermilabFermilab

Wilson Hall in Fall
Innovation in science and technology has always been the driving force behind Fermilab's basic research at the frontiers of elementary particle physics and related disciplines. Fermilab's contributions to science and technology are routinely honored by the scientific community. On occasion, our award-winning inventions, discoveries, and breakthroughs have attracted the attention and recognition of the White House and the President of the United States.
The White House

The exhibit includes photographs, documents, and mementos of Presidential recognition of Fermilab's scientists. Featured objects recall the presentations of the 1973 National Medal of Science to Robert R. Wilson by President Richard M. Nixon, the 1989 National Medal of Technology to Helen T. Edwards, Richard A. Lundy, J. Richie Orr and Alvin V. Tollestrup by President George H. W. Bush, and the 1992 Enrico Fermi Award to Leon M. Lederman by President Bill Clinton.

1973 NATIONAL MEDAL OF SCIENCE

ROBERT RATHBUN WILSON

For unusual ingenuity in designing experiments to explore the fundamental particles of matter and in designing and constructing the machines to produce the particles, culminating in the world's most powerful particle accelerator.

Source: http://www.nsf.gov/nsb/awards/nms/recip_details.cfm?recip_id=393

1973 National Medal of Science presented to Robert R. Wilson by President Richard M. Nixon, October 10, 1973 1973 National Medal of Science (front view) 1973 National Medal of Science (back view)

1984 ENRICO FERMI AWARD

Dr. Robert R. Wilson (above right) receives the 1984 Enrico Fermi Award for atomic energy from Secretary of Energy Don Hodel

Dr. Robert R. Wilson (above right) receives the 1984 Enrico Fermi Award for atomic energy from Secretary of Energy Don Hodel in a recent ceremony at Department of Energy Headquarters. Dr. Wilson, the first director of Fermilab, is currently professor of Physics at Columbia University. He was honored for "outstanding contributions to physics and particle accelerator design and construction."

Source: Energy Technology Visuals Collection, DOE, Washington, DC

1986 ENRICO FERMI AWARD

1986 Enrico Fermi Award


1989 NATIONAL MEDAL OF TECHNOLOGY

National Medal of Science and Technology

"Scientific and technological advancement have always been at the very heart of our nation's pioneer spirit, pushing the boundaries of our knowledge, creating economic opportunity, and certainly increasing our standard of living and making this a healthier and safer world in which to live... As a nation, we have no natural resource more precious that our intellectual resources."

George Bush
March 3, 1989

National Medal of Science and Technology

* * *

HELEN EDWARDS
RICHARD A. LUNDY
J. RICHIE ORR
ALVIN TOLLESTRUP

For their contributions to the design, construction and initial operation of the TEVATRON particle accelerator. The scientific instrument was designed to explore the fundamental properties of matter. The innovative design and successful operation of the TEVATRON has been crucial to the design of the Superconducting Super Collider, the planned next generation particle accelerator.

* * *

President George H. W. Bush presenting the National Medal of Technology to Alvin V. Tollestrup, October 18, 1989 Helen Edwards after receiving the National Medal of Technology from President George H. W. Bush, October 18, 1989 1989 National Medal of Technology recipients: (left to right) Richard A. Lundy, J. Ritchie Orr, Helen T. Edwards and Alvin V. Tollestrup President George H. W. Bush congratulating Alvin V. Tollestrup, October 18, 1989 Alvin V. Tollestrup relaxing in the Red Room of the White House, October 18, 1989
Presentation case enclosing the 1989 National Medal of Technology 1989 National Medal of Technology (front view) 1989 National Medal of Technology presented to Alvin V. Tollestrup (back view)

1992 ENRICO FERMI AWARD

LEON M. LEDERMAN

For his pioneering achievements in high energy physics exemplified by his discovery of the upsilon particle and the muon neutrino, which are seminal contributions to our understanding of nature; for his leadership in the creation of the world's first major super-conducting accelerator at Fermilab; and for his leadership in science education at all levels of society.

Source: http://www.sc.doe.gov/sc-5/fermi/html/Laureates/1990s/leonm.htm

President Bill Clinton with Enrico Fermi Prize Winners John S. Foster and Leon M. Lederman in the Oval Office with Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary (far left) and Presidential Science Advisor John Gibbons (far right), and Ellen Lederman in background, July 29, 1993 1992 Enrico Fermi Award (front view) 1992 Enrico Fermi Award presented to Leon M. Lederman (back view)

This exhibit is brought to you by the History and Archives Project of the Fermilab Directorate during the 3rd Annual Archives Week in Chicago, Oct. 10-16, 2004, proclaimed by Mayor Richard M. Daley (http://www.vandercook.edu/archives/CAAimages/proclamation2004.gif) and sponsored by the Chicago Area Archivists.

We appreciate the cooperation of Ellen and Leon Lederman, and Janine and Alvin Tollestrup for lending objects for this exhibit. We would also like to thank the Fermilab Security Department, the Fermilab Office of Public Affairs, and the Fermilab Visual Media Services Department, including the Duplicating Office, for their assistance.